Matthew McConaughey: Limbo Is the Hardest Part of Covid-19 Pandemic

The ‘Dallas Buyers Club’ actor opens up about his struggles with ‘anticipation fatigue’ as he talks about life in quarantine during the ongoing coronavirus pandemic.

AceShowbizMatthew Mcconaughey has been struggling with the “limbo” part of the Covid-19 pandemic.

The “Dallas Buyers Club” star has been in lockdown alongside wife Camila Alves and their three children, Levi, 12, Vida, 10, and seven-year-old Livingston amid the coronavirus pandemic. However, he’s been finding it hard that he can’t see the end of the road.

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“Limbo is the hardest part,” he said on “Good Morning Britain” on Tuesday (15Dec20). “We all do better when we have a definitive yes or no or understanding when the end is going to be of some crisis. We haven’t had that for some time, so it’s been sort of a one-way ticket to limbo. Quite a few of us get what I call ‘anticipation fatigue.’ For the last eight months every night many people are going to bed thinking maybe tomorrow it is over, and then they are let down. And then the next day they are let down… you are burning thirty, forty per cent of your energy because you are thinking maybe it will be over soon.”

However, despite the challenges, Matthew has been doing his best to look at the positives in the situation.

“As soon as this became inevitable, I chose to say, ‘What are the assets of this?’ Well, ok my kids are getting to spend every day with their grandmother, we are eating two meals a day and saying our prayers before meals, we are spending more time in the kitchen, my kids aren’t going to school but they are learning self-reliance, they are learning how to double down on their creative hobbies that maybe they wouldn’t have had time to do if they were in school,” he explained. “And if anything they are going to have one hell of a story to tell, that other generations are not going to be able to tell… When you are stripped down to your necessities, you are forced to think, ‘What is it I value?’ and maybe rearrange what we value in life.”

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